Food & DrinkWHAT IS GLUTAMINE?

WHAT IS GLUTAMINE?

-

Glutamine is among the most commonly found amino acids in our bodies. But do you know what an amino acid is? Well, it’s impossible to talk about amino acids without talking about proteins, since proteins are made up of amino acids.

As our structure is made up of cellular tissues (proteins), in comparison, amino acids would be the clay of the bricks that form the walls of the human body. Continuing this analogy, glutamine would be clay with characteristics to develop a brick with more specific functions. Amazing, isn’t it? Then follow the line of reasoning to see how it can get more interesting.

MAIN FUNCTIONS OF GLUTAMINE

Among the main functions that glutamine plays in the human body are: 

1. STIMULATION OF PROTEIN AND ENERGY SYNTHESIS

This is the ergogenic resource that can be used to improve performance in high-performance athletes, decreasing fatigue and improving recovery. 

It has been documented in studies that high endurance athletes showed a decrease in circulating glutamine after exercise, presenting a possible compromise in the supply of glutamine to the immune cells. This is because the glutamine present was used by muscle, liver and kidney cells that were in greater demand.

Studies also report that marathon runners who are glutamine-deficient are more likely to have infections and injuries. In cases of overtraining. Glutamine supplementation is of paramount importance for the athlete’s good and quick recovery.

2. RESTORATION OF THE INTESTINAL WALL AND MUCOSA 

Glutamine is the best raw material, as well as being preferred, to build our gut cells. And do you know the importance of having a healthy bowel? The organ is the place where there is the greatest production of antibodies, reaching 70% of them, not to mention lymphocytes (defence cells).

When our intestine is with some structural compromise, glutamine is essential for it to be able to have an efficient repair. 

In cases of cancer treatment, it is suggested that glutamine supplementation has the power to reduce gastrointestinal and neurological complications.

3. STRUCTURING AND ENERGY SOURCE OF IMMUNE AND NEUROLOGICAL SYSTEM CELLS

Glutamine has a great influence on human immune capacity. It serves as energy and structure for immune system cells, pancreatic beta cells, neurons and also very important precursors of the antioxidant glutathione. be with immunity and neurons up to date is super important, isn’t it? 

Studies report that the body can show a significant decrease in circulating glutamine when it is under metabolic stress, thus affecting immune cells.

WELL, SINCE GLUTAMINE PLAYS A KEY ROLE IN HOMEOSTASIS, IMMUNITY IN CELL AND INTESTINAL REGENERATION, IT’S NO SURPRISE THAT STOCKS MUST ALWAYS BE FULL!

IS GLUTAMINE ESSENTIAL OR NOT ESSENTIAL?

Perhaps you’ve heard that there are essential and non-essential amino acids. Furthermore, essential amino acids must be present in the foods we eat, as our bodies cannot synthesize them, and non-essential amino acids do not need to be consumed on a daily basis, as our bodies are capable of producing them on their own.

Glutamine has been classified since 1912 as a non-essential amino acid. But as you may have already understood from its functions above, it is actually not “non-essential” at all.

What the “non-essential amino acid” classification means is that glutamine is so essential that our own body is capable of producing it on its own so we don’t run out of it.

According to kinetic studies, it is estimated that healthy people have 80 g of glutamine every day in their bloodstream, but only 5 to 8 g are derived from food.

Currently, in the studies being done on amino acids, glutamine has been classified in a new way as a conditionally essential amino acid. It is conditionally essential, because in some moments that our body cannot handle the production, it is important to ingest glutamine source foods or supplementation.

WHAT FOODS ARE RICH IN GLUTAMINE?

1. MEAT

Meat is the best-known source of protein, being also rich in glutamine. Beef, pork, fish and poultry meats contain a considerable amount of glutamine in their protein compositions, which can vary between day-to-day preparations.  

2. BEANS

Beans are a legume, a vegetable protein source, which is accompanied by a whole grain is complete, containing all the amino acids, including glutamine. 

In addition to amino acids, legumes are also great sources of fibre, carbohydrates, vitamin A, vitamin C, iron and calcium. Also, they are low in fat.

3. OIL SEEDS AND SEEDS

A source of good fats, proteins and fibre, peanuts, almonds and sunflower seeds, for example, are also sources of glutamine. These foods, in addition to being delicious and practical, are already part of the routine of many of us.

4 CHEESES

Cheeses, especially cured ones such as Parmesan, contain a good amount of glutamine. Mozzarella is also included in cheeses that have more glutamine, as well as gruyere, provolone and gouda.

Latest news

Earning Halloween exciting for everybody | Wellbeing | swoknews.com – The Lawton Structure

Creating Halloween enjoyable for everyone | Wellness | swoknews.com  The Lawton Constitution Resource backlink

Slide spouse and children enjoyable in Fort Dodge | Information, Sporting activities, Work opportunities

&#13 &#13 <!-- SHOW ARTICLE --&#13 &#13 -Messenger photo by Michaela Frerichs Cooper Elementary students enjoy art and music while drawing and listening...

Yucaipa farm features Halloween spouse and children enjoyable – San Bernardino Sun

There is a lot less than a week left of gourds and goblins at Are living Oak Canyon...

Proficiently Wild Episode 1763: Environment Series Preview, Enjoyment Actuality Edition

Meg Rowley and visitor co-host Sarah Langs of MLB.com banter about Sarah’s participation in MLB’s to start with...

Must read

Do the latest GPT-3 tools spell doom for copywriters?

Content writing has become more important as a way...

You might also likeRELATED
Recommended to you